Apr
10
6:30 am06:30

The Alternative Menuhin

  • JW3

As part of a week-long celebration of 100 Years since Yehudi Menuhin's birth, Sophie hosts and joins an all-star cast to celebrate the Alternative Menuhin

Nov
18
1:00 am01:00

Yellow Ticket Live Improvised Soundtrack @ Barbican

  • Barbican Cinema

Jewish girl Lea (Polish actress-turned-Hollywood superstar Pola Negri)  is forced to hide her identity in order to attend medical school in St. Petersburg. A melodrama of multiple oppression, Lea is at a disadvantage as a woman, an orphan and a Jew - and yet has immense persistence and insatiable ambition.
 
Partly filmed in the Jewish part of pre-World War II Warsaw, this rare screening of a classic silent film is accompanied by live, improvised music from Sophie Solomon and Band.

German 1918 Dir Eugen Illés and Viktor Janson 63 min

Jul
2
Jul 3

Drawing Life: Special Preview Performance

  • JW3

The Jewish Music Institute’s commission, Drawing Life, a multi-media composition about children in Terezin by Jocelyn Pook. Drawing Life is a dramatised song cycle with film and video, based on the book I Never Saw Another Butterfly. Featuring poems and drawings by Jewish children imprisoned in Terezin, Pook draws inspiration from the children’s creative spirit. The commission marks the 70th anniversary of the start of the disintegration of the Terezin concentration camp in 1944 and the thirtieth year of the Jewish Music Institute.

Terezin was a walled 18th Century garrison town in former Czechoslovakia used as a concentration camp for more than 150,000 Jews. Between 1941 and 1944, of the 15,000 children deported there and then to Auschwitz, only 100 survived. The children’s poems and drawings, stuffed into walls or buried outside, are a moving  testament to the prisoners resilience. Freidl Dicker-Brandeis, a Terezin inmate, who was an artist and educator before the war, organised art classes for the child inmates, seeing art as a way for the young to express themselves. Helga Weiss on her father’s advice was encouraged “to draw what you can see” and depicted the intimate details of camp life in her drawings.

 

Feb
23
8:30 pm20:30

50 Years of Fiddler on the Roof with Henry Goodman

50 years of Fiddler on the Roof

Jeremy Dauber, Henry Goodman, Chair: Sophie Solomon

Update: Actor Henry Goodman, who played Tevye in the 2007 London stage version of Fiddler on the Roof joins the line-up for this event. 

We celebrate a half-century since the opening of Fiddler on the Roof on Broadway, looking at the life of the musical on stage and screen and Sholem Aleichem’s Yiddish stories that inspired it. What is it about Fiddler’s winning combination of family, tradition and song that has had such a hold on the Jewish cultural imagination ever since?

Jeremy Dauber’s The Worlds of Sholem Aleichem: The Remarkable Life and Afterlife of the Man Who Created Teyve is the first comprehensive biography of one of the most beloved authors of all time, dubbed by The New York Times as “the Jewish Mark Twain”.

Praise for Dauber's book has included this from Nicole Krauss, who credits him with shining... "a light on what it means to be us: to be a Jew in this place and this time. It's an experience that might be almost painful if Dauber's book weren't so funny, sharp, profound, and utterly alive".

- See more at: http://www.jewishbookweek.com/past-events/1168#sthash.FYQjXkGY.dpuf

Feb
23
8:00 pm20:00

Drawing Life: Special Preview Performance

  • Kings Place

The Jewish Music Institute’s commission, Drawing Life, a multi-media composition about children in Terezin by Jocelyn Pook. Drawing Life is a dramatised song cycle with film and video, based on the book I Never Saw Another Butterfly. Featuring poems and drawings by Jewish children imprisoned in Terezin, Pook draws inspiration from the children’s creative spirit. The commission marks the 70th anniversary of the start of the disintegration of the Terezin concentration camp in 1944 and the thirtieth year of the Jewish Music Institute.

Terezin was a walled 18th Century garrison town in former Czechoslovakia used as a concentration camp for more than 150,000 Jews. Between 1941 and 1944, of the 15,000 children deported there and then to Auschwitz, only 100 survived. The children’s poems and drawings, stuffed into walls or buried outside, are a moving  testament to the prisoners resilience. Freidl Dicker-Brandeis, a Terezin inmate, who was an artist and educator before the war, organised art classes for the child inmates, seeing art as a way for the young to express themselves. Helga Weiss on her father’s advice was encouraged “to draw what you can see” and depicted the intimate details of camp life in her drawings.